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The information and insight you give us makes a huge difference to the work that we do. You give us a picture and understanding of what local patients, carers, the public and other stakeholders need from local services. Here are just some of the areas where your input has made a big difference:

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Helping shape the future of carers’ support services

A carer is anyone – child or adult - who looks after a family member, partner or friend who needs help because of their illness, frailty, disability, a mental health problem or an addiction and cannot cope without their support. The care they give is unpaid.

The role of unpaid carers is estimated to contribute over £900 million to the health and care economy in Bradford District and Craven.

As part of our work to improve the experiences of carers and support their vital contribution, the CCGs and local councils work together to commission a carers’ support service. 

Throughout June & July 2018, we carried out an engagement project to hear the views and experiences of local carers.  Around 450 carers took part, telling us about what matters most to them, what challenges they face and what helps them keep going.  This insight is being used to develop the support service for carers across our district, for example:

  • Carers told us that some of the things that can make the biggest difference to them are good quality advice and information, social support from peers, and a carers support service that’s is easy for them to access in their local community.  Based on what we heard, the service specification for carer’s support will now include elements to address these needs.
  • People from BME backgrounds and working carers told us that they often found it particularly hard to get support.  The new carer’s support service will be asked to address this by making sure they establish good relationships with local communities and make their services accessible to all carers.

 The new Carers’ Support Service will be in place from April 2019.

 The insight from this engagement will also be used to develop a refreshed carers strategy for Bradford District & Craven, and influence the way other services we commission or provide involve and support carers. 

 The full engagement report is available here.

The big conversation - #oursaycounts

Throughout July and August 2017, Healthwatch Bradford and District worked on behalf of local partners to create a ‘big conversation’ with local people about the future of health and social care.

They wanted to find out what mattered most to people, where there might be areas for compromise, and what people think could be done differently in the future. Over 800 people gave their views.

What we heard from the public has directly influenced our decision making across the health and care system. The report is was presented to the Bradford Health and Wellbeing Board and used as the basis for the ‘Happy, Healthy & at Home’ plan for the future of health and care in Bradford District and Craven.

This plan sits within the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and Care Partnership.

During the ‘Big Conversation’ people shared lots of comments and ideas, not only thinking of their own needs but often wider issues and needs of the whole population. We heard about GP practices more often than any other aspect of health and care, particularly about access to GP appointments.

Some other common themes were around growing the focus on wellbeing and prevention, and creating community-based services. These ideas are built in to our plans for developing new models in primary care.

For more detail about what people had to say, see the full report here or email info@healthwatchbradford.co.uk.

West Yorkshire and Harrogate Stroke Care

As one of the partners in the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Health and care partnership, we have been engaging and talking with with staff, partners and the public about stroke care since this project began in February 2017. We have kept people updated throughout to ensure everyone had the opportunity to have their say on the development of the work.

On Tuesday 6 November 2018 a report was presented to the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Joint Committee of Clinical Commissioning Groups (meeting in public), to provide an overview of progress, conclusions, recommendations and next steps.  You can read the report here. You can also read this letter sent to all stakeholders informing them of the decision made by the Joint Committee of Clinical Commissioning groups

 The decision from the Joint Committee of Clinical Commissioning Groups concludes the West Yorkshire and Harrogate Stroke Programme work on hyper acute stroke services.

However, it is important to note that our conversations with people across the area have highlighted the importance of further improving care from prevention, hospital stroke care, community rehabilitation services,  through to after care.

These conversations will continue in the six local areas (Bradford District and Craven; Calderdale, Harrogate, Kirklees, Leeds and Wakefield) which make up West Yorkshire and Harrogate as appropriate.

We would like to thank everyone for their involvement on the West Yorkshire and Harrogate stroke care work.  You can find out how your views have shaped our work by reading 'You said, we did' . You can also find out about all the engagement that has taken place here

Grass roots reporting

People share stories and feedback about health and care services in many different ways, such as:

Our Grass Roots system brings together all this insight to help us build a better picture of what’s working well and where improvements need to be made.

Grass Roots reports are discussed by our Joint Quality Committee to identify actions that need to be taken, and Grass Roots insight regularly informs our commissioning decisions.

For example a pattern of feedback relating to the experiences of Deaf patients has resulted in us working with Bradford Talking Media to develop awareness training for primary care staff.

Flagging patients' needs in medical records

Using the feedback you give us that goes into our Grass Roots reporting, we could see that we needed to improve the experiences of people who use health services and need accessible information. 

Some of the specific experiences we identified from Grass Roots included:

  • appointment letters sent to people with visual impairments,
  • translators for language or British Sign Language (BSL) not being arranged at clinics, 
  • information not provided in a way that can be used.

What we did

A project group was set up to look at this area. This group included four GP practices from Bradford City and Bradford Districts CCGs, CCG staff and patient groups. The outcome was that the group identified a way of flagging disabled patients’ access needs in SystmOne, the patient record system used by local GP practices. 

As a result, the patient record system used by local GP practices has been updated so that where a patient has a need for accessible information, this can be flagged within their patient record. A questionnaire, developed by patients, acts as a guide for practice staff when talking to patients about their access needs and what reasonable support is needed.

This project has been shared with NHS England as a key way for practices and CCGs to ensure they meet the requirements of the new Accessible Information Standard introduced in 2016. We have now set up a new joint group wiht the local authority and NHS Trusts to see how this can be implemented more widely. 

Mental health - future in mind

Feedback and insight from young people helped develop our strategy for young people’s mental health and wellbeing - Future in Mind.  We listened and incorporated into the strategy some key areas of insight gained from children, young people and their families. These included: 

  • young people’s feedback on services through our voluntary and community partners,
  • hearing and exploring young people’s voices and experiences,
  • sharing good practice for youth engagement,
  • working with schools – including parents and those responsible for child health
  • young women and use of health services – particularly focusing on experiences of self-harm and self-esteem
  • access to primary care services
  • use of urgent and emergency care services

You can read more about how children and young people contributed to the Future in Mind strategy here.

Thrive website

Young people in Bradford have helped developed the Thrive website which supports the mental health and wellbeing of young people. The idea came from consutlation with young people who wanted more information and help regarding their emotional health and mental wellbeing. The Thrive Bradford website has been developed with specific content and information for young people. It also signpostes to services and gives real stories and scenarios. 

You can find out more about the Thrive website here, including stories from some of the young people who were involved in creating it.

thrive-people

Young people's engagement event

Getting young people interested and involved in shaping local health services was the key theme of our first young people’s event in October 2015, jointly hosted by local NHS organisations.  

In response to what young people told us they were most interested in, we created content for future events covering issues such as emotional health and wellbeing, sexual health and relationships, drug awareness, the effects of smoking and drinking, and NHS careers.

A similar event was run in October 2017, and another is planned for October 2019.

Having an engaged and active young population meant that Bradford was the perfect host city for Self Care Everywhere – an action packed day of workshops, supported by NHS England and partner organisations across the region but led and designed by young people themselves.

Patient and public voice in governance

So that our commissioning decisions are informed by listening to local people, we have embedded patient and public representatives in our governance structures, to make sure we hear the voices of patients and the public at all levels.

Involvement in governance includes:

  • the appointment of lay members to our governing body, who are involved in
  • representatives involved in clinical board meetings,
  • representatives involved in our INVOLVE group, which oversees Communities, Engagement and Equalities activity
  • representatives involved in the network steering groups and advisory groups covering areas of strategic priorities such as improving patient experience, diabetes, heart disease; and,
  • representatives involved in the recruitment of permanent staff to the CCG.

Lay members work closely with our People’s Board and Patient Network, to ensure they are closely connected with the views and experiences of patients and the public.

Individual participation

Our CCG learns from patients in a variety of ways. One of the main ways that we do this is through our governing body hearing first-hand from patients and their families about their experiences of NHS services and how they can be improved.

Recently, our governing body has heard about experiences including;

  • how cardiac rehabilitation was adapted for a patient with dementia
  • the impact of our Future in Mind programme on young people’s mental health and wellbeing

You can read the patient experiences heard by our governing body in the governing body meeting minutes. These can all be found in our governing body papers