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19/10/15

Innovative diabetes campaign spreads across Bradford

Innovative diabetes campaign spreads across Bradford

The innovative Bradford Beating Diabetes (BBD) campaign is expanding across the district to help thousands more people at risk of developing diabetes.

From this month, people living in the Bradford Districts CCG area are being offered the chance to improve their health by getting a diabetes check-up and, if needed, advice and support to improve their lifestyle and cut their diabetes risk.

The BBD campaign was launched in Bradford almost two years ago to tackle the growing problem of diabetes among local people, and so far 1,000 new patients have been identified.

It is aimed at identifying anyone in Bradford who may be at risk of becoming diabetic in the future and making sure they receive the most appropriate advice, care and support to prevent or delay the onset of the condition.

It also supports those who are currently being treated for diabetes, ensuring they receive the correct healthcare so they can manage their symptoms and prevent any related, serious conditions from developing.

Dr Chris Harris, GP lead for diabetes at Bradford Districts CCG, said: “We’re really excited about bringing the benefits of Bradford Beating Diabetes to so many new people, and helping them to find out quickly and easily whether they actually have diabetes or are at a stage where they can make some lifestyle changes to prevent it.”

Since 2013, more than 12,000 people in the City area who are at risk of developing diabetes have taken part in the programme, 6,000 of whom have received lifestyle advice from their GP or healthcare team.  A further 200 are taking part in the programme’s 12 month intensive lifestyle change programme to help prevent them developing the disease in the future.  And more people than ever are now receiving all of the recommended health checks as part of their diabetes treatment and follow-ups.

The success of the campaign has led to it being rolled out to the wider Bradford area so even more people can improve their health.

Bradford Districts CCG’s priority will now be to work with around 9,000 people who have been identified as being at high risk of developing diabetes.

The campaign is starting with letters going to all those people who are already at moderate or high risk, so they come to their GP practice for another blood test to check their glucose levels – a key indicator of diabetes. Then, depending on the results, they will be offered a tailor-made package of treatment and advice.

“Diabetes is on the rise locally as well as nationally - so it is a real health challenge for us,” added Dr Harris. “We want to prevent as many Bradford patients as possible developing diabetes and to provide excellent care and advice to those who do have diabetes, so they stay well and in control of their condition.

“People often think that diabetes is just something that’s going to happen to them because of a family history of the condition or the fact that they know so many people who have it. This campaign has already shown that diabetes isn’t inevitable if more people knew how simple changes to their diet and lifestyle can reduce their risk.”

Many patients will be able to go away with expert advice to reduce their chance of getting diabetes, while others at higher risk will be offered an intensive lifestyle change programme (ILCP) to support them to lose weight, get more active and eat a healthy diet. The most important thing is that people get tested so that they know their risk and can take action.

The BBD campaign has been recognised for its innovation, having been named as one of seven demonstrator sites for the National NHS Diabetes Prevention Programme.

The programme - a joint initiative between NHS England, Public Health England and Diabetes UK - aims to significantly reduce the four million people in England otherwise expected to have Type 2 diabetes by 2025.

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