How are we doing?

Find out what our data tells us about cancer services in Bradford. 

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Diagnosis at an early stage

Diagnosing cancer at an early stage (known as stage one or stage two) is associated with higher rates of survival than cancer diagnosed at a later stage of development.

  • half of patients diagnosed with cancer are diagnosed at an early stage,
  • in our CCG, 48.6% of people with cancer are diagnosed at either stage 1 or stage 2. 

There are a number of measures in place to improve the rates of early cancer diagnosis, including:

  • screening programmes,
  • information and education campaigns,
  • greater access for GPs to diagnostic services.

Improving cancer survival is one of the three ambitions of the Achieving world-class cancer outcomes: a strategy for England 2015-20, which was published by the Independent Cancer Taskforce in July 2015.

We aim to deliver a year-on-year improvement in the proportion of cancers diagnosed at stage one and stage two; reducing the proportion of cancers diagnosed following an emergency admission.

The national average for the proportion of tumours diagnosed at Stages 1 and 2 is 49.8%.

What we are doing to improve early diagnosis of cancer (at stage 1 or 2)

To support earlier diagnosis of cancer at stage 1 and 2 we aim to improve uptake of screening programmes locally and the CCG will continue to engage with GP practices to support best practice.  This includes work with GP practice nurse forums which has been supported by visits from Cancer Research UK.  In addition to work with primary care, the CCG will engage with local third sector organisations to access local faith and community groups. By reaching out to people and increasing awareness of the early symptoms of cancer we aim to reduce the proportion of cancers diagnosed following an emergency hospital admission. 

See what we are doing to help diagnose cancer at an early stage and how you can help.

Waiting times - 62 day standard

This standard measures the proportion of people with an urgent GP referral for suspected cancer who began their first definitive treatment within 62 days of the urgent referral.  We are just below the 62 day cancer standard of 85% with a year to date result of 84.5%

The CCG aims to continue to adhere to this standard ensuring both performance monitoring and the necessary governance arrangements are in place to ensure exceptions are investigated and reported. Shorter waiting times for cancer patients can:

  • help ease patient anxiety
  • lead to earlier diagnosis
  • mean quicker treatment
  • reduce the risk of complications
  • contribute towards an enhanced patient experience
  • improve cancer outcomes.

The cancer 62 day standard is one of the NHS Constitutional standards for waiting times. It aims to span the whole patient pathway, from referral to first treatment. The 62 days covers the time from urgent GP referral, to the first outpatient appointment, decision to treat and finally the first definitive treatment.

GP engagement and training events are being run to disseminate best practice and strengthen links between primary and secondary care. There will be an increase in direct access diagnostic testing to increase the speed and efficiency with which patients move along their treatment pathway.

What we are doing to maintain NHS constitution cancer standards

The Healthy Futures cancer work programme is developing a system wide model of care for cancer across West Yorkshire.    The West Yorkshire and Harrogate Cancer Alliance Board will work to implement a single delivery plan for cancer. This aims to ensure patients have access to some of the best diagnostic services for cancer which enables earlier diagnosis and treatment. The system wide model will also form part of our sustainability and transformation plan (STP) which looks at how we can provide sustainable, joined up care, which puts patients at the centre.

One year survival from all cancers

This measure looks at the one year survival rate of all adults between the ages of 15 and 99 who have been diagnosed with a first primary, invasive malignancy.

If comparing the rates of cancer survival with other countries, there have been improvements in all countries for breast, colorectal, lung and ovarian cancer patients. However, the gap in survival between the highest performing countries (which includes Australia, Canada and Sweden) and the lowest performing countries (which includes England) has remained largely unchanged (with the exception of breast cancer where we England are narrowing the gap).

Improving cancer survival is one of the ambitions of Achieving world-class cancer outcomes: a strategy for England 2015-20, published by the Independent Cancer Taskforce in July 2015.

65.8% patients survived at one year, demonstrating improvement on previous years.  However, this is still the seventh lowest survival rate in England. When compared to the England and West Yorkshire rate our result was slower and shows the CCG has the greatest need for improvement.

What we are doing to increase cancer survival 

Working closely with our Public Health colleagues at Bradford Metropolitan District Council we aim to raise awareness amongst local people around the risks of cancer and how to improve prevention. This will include more public engagement through the Council Smoking Cessation and Obesity services and helping the public understand how they can reduce the risk of cancer.  We will aim to diagnose cancer at an early stage and treat quicker, thereby improving the patient outcomes.

Patient experience

Improving patient experience of cancer care and treatment (and quality of life) is one the of the three key ambitions in the report Achieving world-class cancer outcomes: a strategy for England 2015-20, published by the Independent Cancer Taskforce in July 2015. The taskforce has set an ambition for the continuous improvement in patient experience and have given this an equal priority with improving clinical outcomes.

The patient experience rating in our CCG was 8.5 / 10 (1 being the lowest and 10 the highest) in 2015, with 8.5 /10 being the national average. 

What we are doing to improve the patient experience for people with cancer:

We will make further progress in improving how we perform against national cancer standards so that patients and their families get the best possible experience. We will be concentrating on the following standards, to make sure patients are:

  • seen within 2 weeks of an urgent GP referral for suspected cancer,
  • treated within 62 days of an urgent GP referral for suspected cancer. This includes making sure that we have the right capacity for diagnostics.
  • treated within 31 days of when a decision to treat is made.

We will make further progress to improve survival rates after one year of diagnosis, by delivering a year on year improvement in the proportion of cancers diagnosed at stage one and stage two and thereby reduce the proportion of cancers diagnosed following an emergency admission. Generally the cancer survival rate is increased the earlier a cancer is diagnosed.

See what we are doing to improve your experience of cancer services in Bradford.